The 4th International Conference on Ethiopian Women in the Diaspora , March 7, 2015, Washington DC, USA

At its 4th annual international conference, the Center for Rights of Ethiopian Women (CREW) plans to consider the role of civil society organizations in the upcoming elections in Ethiopia. The main objective is to create an understanding of the magnitude of the negative impacts of the Societies and Charities Law on the activities of nongovernmental organizations. As a women’s civil society organization, CREW will also pay special attention to Ethiopian women’s participation in the political process. Thus, one of the major questions that the conference will address will be the role of women’s organizations in mobilizing women to use their rights towards fair and free elections. Please click here to register for the conference online.

Call For Papers: The Role of Civil Society Organization (CSOs) in the Upcoming Elections in Ethiopia

crewLogoMarch 7, 2015 Washington DC, USA

At its 4th annual international conference, the Center for Rights of Ethiopian Women (CREW) plans to consider the role of civil society organizations in the upcoming elections in Ethiopia. The main objective is to create an understanding of the magnitude of the negative impacts of the Societies and Charities Law on the activities of nongovernmental organizations. As a women’s civil society organization, CREW will also pay special attention to Ethiopian women’s participation in the political process. Thus, one of the major questions that the conference will address will be the role of women’s organizations in mobilizing women to use their rights towards fair and free elections. With that in view, the conference is intended to cover the following themes. Read more

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CREW’s Editorial: The Charities and Societies Proclamation and its impact on human rights and women’s rights activism in Ethiopia

crewLogoEthiopia passed the Charities and Societies Proclamation (CSP), (No.621/2009), in February 2009 to regulate the work of civil society organizations in the country. This Law classified Ethiopian organizations into Charities or Societies, Resident Societies and Foreign Charities, and required all non-governmental organizations to register under one of these. Regardless of calls by different international commissions on human rights for its amendment, the CSP law is still untouched. It is still obstructing human right activism, including the monitoring of information on human rights.

As an Ethiopian women’s rights organization, the Center for the rights of Ethiopian Women (CREW) opposes the Charities and Societies Proclamation. CREW advocates against women’s and human right abuses perpetrated from any position of power, familial, governmental or other. CREW, therefore, strongly calls for the amendment of the Charities and Societies Proclamation. Read more

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Fourth International Conference on Ethiopian Women [Registration]

crew1The Center for the Rights of Ethiopian Women (CREW) will have its fourth international conference of Ethiopian women in the Diaspora on March 7, 2015 in Washington, DC.  The theme of the conference is “the Role of Civil Society Organization (CSOs) in the Upcoming Elections in Ethiopia”. The registration fee for the conference is $15. Please check out below with Pay Pal to complete your registration.

Conference Fee ($15 One time payment)

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Former manager of the Israel Broadcasting Authority’s Reshet A brings Kahlon’s six-person list to gender parity

tsaga malkoUntil today, everywhere I go, one question follows me: ‘Miss, I need my house cleaned twice a week. Are you free for cleaning?,’” Melaku said. “Today, I say, ‘Yes, I’m free to clean up. Not houses, but corruption.”

Moshe Kahlon has enlisted Tsega Melaku, an Ethiopian-Israeli woman who managed the Israel Broadcasting Authority’s Reshet Alef, to his Koolanu party. At a Tel Aviv press conference on Sunday, Kahlon praised Melaku as a doer, a quality he said was central to his party. “Only with people like this can we bring change, and this change will not be an easy one.

People who do not shy away from battles, who do not look for excuses, people that simply get up and do,” he said, calling her a woman of fortitude and strong will. Read more

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Gang rape spurs calls for reform in Ethiopia

Women’s rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.

By Jacey Fortin, Aljazeerahanaa

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - Inside a gated home on the western outskirts of Ethiopia’s capital, a picture of Hanna Lalango is framed in a wreath of flowers just beginning to wilt around the edges. The 16-year-old girl died on November 1, about a month after she entered a public mini-bus and was gang-raped by the strangers on board.

Hanna’s story is strikingly similar to a tragedy that took place in India two years ago, when another young woman boarded a bus, was raped by the passengers, and died from her injuries. That incident spawned a mass movement calling for an end to violence against women and impunity for perpetrators, making international headlines and sparking protests across the world’s most populous democracy. But in Ethiopia, Africa’s second-most populous country, the reaction to Hanna’s death has so far been subdued. Read more

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Kidnapped, Raped and Left for Dead: Who Will Protect Ethiopia’s Girls?

justice for hanna

By Rediet Wegayehu, The Guardian

One day in early October, Hanna Lalango, 16, did not return from school to her home in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, at the usual time. Her father Lalongo Hayesso was worried about his youngest daughter.

“We waited for her at her usual time … but we had to wait for 11 days to hear that she had been abandoned on the street. She was incapacitated and couldn’t even get up,” said Hayesso. His daughter had been abducted, gang-raped and left for dead. Hanna was not able to get to hospital until 12 days after her attack, where she was treated for traumatic gynaecological fistula and other injuries. She died on 1 November.

Sexual violence against women in Ethiopia is relatively common. Research from 2012 found that “rape is undoubtedly one of the rampant crimes in Ethiopia”, and linked its prevalence to male chauvinist culture, legal loopholes, the inefficiency of different agencies in the criminal justice system, and “a deep-seated culture of silence”. In October 2011, an Ethiopian Airlines flight attendant named Aberash Hailay lost her eyesight after her ex-husband, Fisseha, stabbed her in both eyes with a sharp knife. Read more

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Teen’s gang rape in Addis Ababa sounds alarm

Gang rape in addisBy Tigist Geme, Aljazeera

Hanna Lalango, 16, died on Nov. 1, from a brutal gang rape after five men kidnapped and held her captive for several days in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa. Hanna attended a private high school in the city’s Ayer Tena neighborhood.

On Oct. 1, the day of her kidnapping, Hanna, the youngest of six siblings, “complained about not feeling well” before she left for school. “She was a typical young girl … a timid and respectful child,” Hanna’s brother told Blen Sahilu, who first posted the story on Facebook, as part of the online #JusticeForHanna campaign. “She was really nice.”

Hanna reportedly left school around 4 p.m. local time and got on a taxi that already had a couple of passengers. It is unclear at what point Hanna knew she was being kidnapped. But the culprits allegedly threatened the teen with knife and took her to one of the suspect’s house. Reports vary but Hanna’s father told the local media she was raped for at least five days. Read more

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