Fundraising Message

We have a fundraising campaign to raise sufficient fund to strengthen The Center for the Rights of Ethiopian Women (CREW). A fundraising kickoff event was held on August 2, 2014 at Howard University, Washington, DC. CREW, therefore, requests your generous monetary assistance to achieve its objectives and goals. If you would like to help, please make your tax deductible donation payable to CREW and send it to CREW, P.O. Box 10412. Silver Spring, MD. 20914. You may also donate online at this website using pay pal.

We thank you in advance for all your support.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

breast cancer awarness new
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to take the steps to have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same. Read more

.

UK Ambassador to Lebanon “Swapped” jobs with an Ethiopian maid

UK ambassdor switched role with EthiopianMaid

The Daily Star, BEIRUT: UK Ambassador to Lebanon Tom Fletcher ”swapped” jobs with an Ethiopian maid Monday in an effort to promote the rights of migrant workers.

“I’m trading places with Kalkedan, from Ethiopia, tomorrow. We want to highlight the rights of foreign domestic workers in Lebanon,” read a post on Fletcher’s Twitter page Sunday.

On Monday Fletcher posted a photo of himself scrubbing away at a silver pot under an open faucet. “Kalkedan supervises my washing up,” the caption read. Read more

.

Crimes Against Womanity: Marriage by Abduction in Ethiopia

crimes against humanityBy : Professor Alemayehu G Mariam 

In my September 7 commentary, DIFRET: The Abduction of a Film in Ethiopia, I expressed my outrage over the aborted Ethiopian premiere of the film DIFRET. That film, based on a “true story” of Aberash Bekele, tells the dramatic story of a teenage victim of the inhuman and barbaric practice of  “telefa” or “marriage by abduction/abduction of child brides” in certain parts of Ethiopia. The screening of that film in Addis Ababa on September 3 was halted seconds before it was scheduled to start. The director of  DIFRET, Zeresenay Berhane Mehari, took the stage and announced with consternation and dismay:

“Distinguished guests, ambassadors, we were just told by the police that we have to stop this film because there is a court order on it. We have not been informed prior to this. The Ministry of Culture knows about this and the government knows about this. This is the first time we are hearing it. This is obviously an attack on us and I am really sorry for this to happen and I hope we’ll see you again…”Read more 

.

No Ethiopians to Kuwait

Foreign workers in RiyadhBy: Muna Al-Fuzai, Kuwait Times

Kuwait is no more open to Ethiopians – male or female workers cannot enter the country. Such a decision is like labeling a nation with the mark of being killers and crazies that need to be banned in order to keep Kuwait safe and secure from possible threats. The Ministry of Interior suspended the entry of all male and female Ethiopians workers since February because of the crime rate recorded among this nationality in terms of murder and theft.

Personally, I think such a decision is unfair and cruel. For example, if someone claims that all Muslims are terrorists because IS and bin Laden are Muslims or Jews are bad people because they are occupying Palestine and calling it the land of Israel, will that make sense to you? Because then all Muslims and Jewish will be no better than the Ethiopians, who have been labeled with similar allegations because some of their people committed crimes here and there. Read more

.

Measuring Women’s Rights and Roles

By Sarah McMullan, Insights Magazine of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Woman sorting grain

What inequalities do women face in Ethiopia? In rural Ethiopia, people say farming is a man’s job. In reality, women play a large role in agriculture from farm to table. Take a drive through the countryside, and you will see women planting, weeding, tending to gardens, and harvesting, among other farm activities. The markets are bustling with women selling produce and small livestock in addition to spices, honey, and shea butter. Why, given their many contributions to agriculture, are women so often marginalized? To help shed more light on gender inequalities, researchers from IFPRI’s gender team and Research for Ethiopia’s Agriculture Policy (REAP) Program are analyzing national data to compare differences between male- and female-headed agricultural households, reviewing the literature on gender gaps in agriculture, and offering training on collecting sex-disaggregated data. Moving forward, the team will shift from comparing male- and female-headed households to showing other indicators that can lead to deeper analysis and understanding of women’s role in agriculture. Read more

.